Trafficking Romani youth and women in Eastern and Central Europe: Analysing the effectiveness

To date, research and data have been very limited on the issue of trafficking of Romani youth and women in Central and Eastern Europe, despite numerous reports on trafficking highlighting the fact that minority groups, particularly Romani communities (in Europe) are particularly vulnerable to this modern from of slavery. The availability of data regarding trafficking has been linked to better policies and improved anti-trafficking work, thus concrete information on how the Romani community is affected by THB is vital to addressing this issue. Consequently, the ERRC in partnership with People in Need Slovakia (Clovek v tisni) on a project to analyse trends in and the current state of legislation, data collection, framework policies and structures and victim support services for victims of trafficking in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia, in light of international and European conventions and related recommendations by intergovernmental bodies. This project, which is part of the European Commission's Daphne III Programme 2007-2013, will take place over the next 2 years.

The project's objectives are:

  • To identify discrepancies between agreed international and regional conventions and national legislation, policies, structures (or the lack thereof);
  • To identify laws and policies in the target countries that might, indirectly, negatively affect Romani victims or potential victims or inadequately serve this group;
  • To show the trends in legislation and policy in the respective countries regarding anti-trafficking efforts and identify potential negative trends;
  • To demonstrate how prevention and victim protection for Romani women and children practically work in the respective countries and emphasise the problems in implementation or inadequate legislative framework; and
  • To use the findings of the research effectively in advocacy for better protection and support for victims and potential victims of trafficking, especially Romani youth and women.

This project includes:

  • Desk research on legislation, data collection, policies and structures, victim support services and trends in each country;
  • Qualitative field research focusing on vulnerability factors and support services for Romani youth and women victims of trafficking;
  • Development and publication of a full-length report of the research findings, including recommendations to the appropriate governments for effectively tackling this issue in Romani communities (Final report: Breaking the Silence: Trafficking in Romani Communities);
  • Translation and publication of the report in languages of the related countries;
  • A dissemination conference to launch the results of the research; and
  • The creation of a dedicated webpage on trafficking issues affecting Romani communities.

For further information on this project, please contact Ostalinda Maya Ovalle at: ostalinda.maya@errc.org

 

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ERRC submission to the European Commission on Roma Inclusion in enlargement countries (May 2017)

25 May 2017

Written comments by the ERRC to the European Commission on enlargement component of the EU Roma Framework.

 

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Roma Rights 1 2017: Roma and Conflict: Understanding the Impact of War and Political Violence

16 May 2017

The impact of conflict on minority populations merits special attention, especially if those minorities have long been marginalized, viewed by the warring parties with a mixture of ambivalence and contempt, and deemed to be communities of little consequence in the peace-building processes that follow the conclusion of hostilities. This issue of Roma Rights Journal takes a look at the fate of Roma during and after conflicts.

Sometimes Roma have been the direct targets of murderous aggression or subject to reprisals. Then there have been the many times where individual Roma actively took a side, but too often the roles played by Roma, Travellers and other minorities were elided from the dominant national narratives that followed.

In many conflicts, caught between warring groups with no foreign power or military alliance to champion their claims, Roma found themselves displaced, despised and declaimed as bogus refugees, nomads and “mere” economic migrants in the aftermath.

As long as Europe’s largest ethnic minority is written out and rendered invisible in the histories of Europe’s wars and conflicts; and excluded from the politics of reconstruction and peace-making, the continent’s self-understanding will remain fatally flawed.

Editors: Marek Szilvasi, Kieran O’Reilly, Bernard Rorke

Roma Rights 1 2017 (PDF)

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Macron Election Call Out

5 May 2017

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