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Amantia Muhedini

24 July 2014

Amantia Muhedini was born and raised in Tirana, Albania. She spent two years studying at an international boarding school in Norway, before moving to the United States to study Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Prior to her summer as a legal intern at the ERRC, Amantia spent six months as an exchange student at Sciences Po, in Paris, and was an intern at the Albanian Embassy in France and the EU Delegation to Albania.

In Albania, she became aware of the discrimination and extreme poverty faced by the Roma community, and following her international school experience, Amantia became more interested in questions of identity, multiculturalism, minorities’ rights and migration. It was shocking and refreshing for her to see the ERRC perspective on the disenfranchisement, discrimination and poverty that the Roma face across Europe due to poor policies and wide-spread racism, especially after studying EU institutions and Roma issues from an academic viewpoint at Princeton.

“I was shocked and upset at the world every single morning after reading the news briefings, and during each conversation with colleagues about policies towards Roma which disregard not only national and international laws, but also the basic principles of human dignity that every person is inherently entitled to.” The confirmation that laws are not always fair, and definitely not equal for all, gave Amantia a new perspective on life and her future work.

Amantia wants to preserve her indignation at the unfairness of the world so that she can channel her energies towards working for human rights in the future. After her Bachelor’s she wants to pursue a Ph.D. on minority rights and multiculturalism and then work in the public sector.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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