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Child Protection Concerns in Czech Republic

20 November 2007

According to a news article in the Prague Daily Monitor of 21 June 2007, a 2-year-old Romani boy died of dehydration in a hospital shortly after he was removed from his family home along with five siblings. The six children were reportedly removed from a single room apartment in the North Bohemian town of Ústí nad Labem where they lived with their family in conditions described by social workers as appalling. Electricity had only recently been introduced to the flat, and the one toilet had to be "evacuated" for repairs and disinfection. Social workers had made five visits to the home in the previous month.

The five remaining children were placed in a children's institution immediately. The Ústí nad Labem city hall spokesperson said that it was presently "impossible to consider returning the children" to the family. In November 2006, In the case Wallova and Walla v. Czech Republic, the European Court of Human Rights found that the Czech government had violated Article 8 (right to family life) of the European Convention for Human Rights for assigning children to state institutions on the sole basis that the family could not care adequately for their children (large family size and inability to find adequate housing) after child protection authorities contented themselves with merely observing the family's efforts to overcome the difficulties they faced. Czech organizations working on Romani issues have noted serious concerns related to the institutionalization of Romani children under such conditions in the country.

(ERRC, Prague Daily Monitor)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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