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Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe visits Hungary

7 November 2002

On September 11, 2002, Mr Alvaro Gil-Robles, Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe, presented a report to the Council of Europe Committee of Ministers and the Parliamentary Assembly on his official visit to Hungary from June 11 to 14, 2002. In his report, Mr Gil-Robles noted "The Roma/Gypsy community is undoubtedly the group most directly affected by the adverse impact of Hungarian society's transition to a market economy. Its members must now deal with difficult situations arising, inter alia, from job insecurity, discrimination in access to education and the lack of decent housing. […] Unemployment has an immediate impact on access to housing, and the situation is scarcely better for those who do have accommodation. Frequently, the latter can no longer pay rent or maintenance costs, and landlords take advantage of this situation to evict them, demolish substandard buildings and subsequently erect new buildings in which flats are offered at rates that they cannot afford. Many Roma/Gypsy families thus find themselves homeless or in run-down and unsanitary housing […]. The Roma/Gypsy community's third cause for concern is access to education. The absence of good-quality education may indeed be a factor in current and future discrimination against this community. […] According to the information I received from the community representatives and my other speakers, Roma/Gypsy children are systematically placed in so-called special, or "C", classes; these classes are also said to receive children from underprivileged backgrounds, who suffer from a social handicap as a result, and the academic level is consequently lower. About 70% of the pupils in "C" classes are said to be Roma/Gypsy children and follow a simplified curriculum, without experienced teachers and with poor facilities. Thus, poverty and Roma/Gypsy origin are allegedly a fact of discrimination in access to education, and this inevitably makes it highly likely that inequalities and social discrimination will be perpetuated." (Full text of Mr Gil-Robles' report ).

(ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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