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Council of Europe Human Rights Commissioner makes recommendation to member states on foreigners' rights

7 November 2001

Council of Europe Human Rights Commissioner Alvaro Gil-Robles sent out his first recommendation since taking office in 1999 to authorities of all 43 Council of Europe member states on September 19, 2001, regarding the rights of non-citizens. The recommendation was issued in response to the precarious legal and humanitarian situation of foreigners arriving at state borders and the treatment of those refused entry or expelled. Mr Gil-Robles reminded member states that foreigners have the right not to be regarded from the outset as criminals, and stressed his concern of reported cases wherein foreigners are turned back as soon as they step off the plane, since this deprives them of any right they might have to request asylum, should they be refugees. He also stressed that there should be strict limits on holding foreigners for lengthy periods in the international areas of airports. Mr Gil-Robles issued his recommendation following a meeting with non-governmental organisations including the ERRC, government representatives and experts in June 2001, to review states' approaches.
 

(Council of Europe)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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