Horizontal Rule

Court in Macedonia releases policemen from charges of beating a Romani man

15 July 1999

On March 10, the first instance court in Štip, Macedonia, found the charges of Mr Jašar Perušan against the Macedonian Ministry of Interior to be unfounded. After reportedly being severely physically abused at the police station in Ĺ tip in April 1998 (see „Snapshots from around Europe", Roma Rights, Spring 1998), Mr Perušan, a 34-year-old Romani man, filed criminal and civil complaints against the police. On March 10, 1999, Mr Perušan was again detained in relation to a previous offence and physically abused by the police, on the day that the third hearing in the trial was taking place.

The court ruled that there was no evidence that the injuries inflicted upon Mr Perušan were caused by the police and at the police station. Also, the court did not accept as valid the medical certificate issued to Mr Perušan the day after the initial incident. Mr Perušan's lawyer, supported by the ERRC, appealed the verdict. Ongoing ERRC research in Macedonia indicates that police brutality, especially police brutality against Roma, is endemic and that police officers are rarely if ever adequately sanctioned for breaches of conduct and physical abuse (see ERRC country report A Pleasant Fiction: the Human Rights Situation of Roma in Macedonia).

(ERRC)

Horizontal Rule

ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

more ...

horizontal rule

The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

more ...

horizontal rule

Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

more ...

horizontal rule