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Court rulings on Roma rights cases in Yugoslavia

15 August 2001

The Belgrade-based non-governmental organisation Humanitarian Law Center (Fond za humanitarno pravo) reported on May 16, 2001, that the County Court in Niš had found twenty-year-old Mr Oliver Nikolić and twenty-year-old Ms Nataša Marković guilty of incitement to racial hatred, pursuant to paragraph 2 of Article 134 of the Yugoslav Penal Code. The verdict was brought in relation to the attack of Mr Nikolić and Ms Marković on a 15-year-old Romani boy, Dragiša Ajdarević, and his father, Mr Nebojša Ajdarević, in Niš, southern Serbia, on April 8, 2000 (see "Snapshots from Around Europe" in Roma Rights 2/2000; available at: Snapshots). The attackers, Mr Nikolić and Ms Marković, were sentenced to six months imprisonment, suspended for two years. This is the first time in Yugoslavia that the judicial authorities have regarded an attack against members of a minority as constituting incitement to racial hatred.

Other courts in Yugoslavia have recently failed to provide adequate judicial remedy in Roma rights cases. On May 25, 2001, the Humanitarian Law Center reported that the Fourth Municipal Prosecutor's Office in Belgrade had dismissed a complaint filed by the organisation against police officers who had used force to evict Roma from the Antena settlement near Belgrade on June 8, 2000 (see "Snapshots around Europe" in Roma Rights 2/2000; on-line at: Snapshots). Despite the fact that the Centre submitted a list of witnesses to the eviction, and medical records of injuries sustained by two Romani individuals during the eviction, the court dismissed the complaint.

(Humanitarian Law Center)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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