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Czech government refuses to demolish pig farm on site of World War II concentration camp

15 July 1999

On May 18, the Czech media reported that their government would provide one million Czech crowns (approximately 26,500 euros) for the completion of a memorial at the place of a concentration camp at Lety near Písek, southern Bohemia, where hundreds of Roma died while interned on racist grounds and in inhuman conditions during World War II (see „Snapshots from around Europe", Roma Rights, Autumn 1998). Several weeks earlier, according to Radio Prague of April 8, the same cabinet refused the proposal of its human rights commissioner Petr Uhl for the purchase and removal of a pig farm built on the site. The Committee for Compensation of the Romani Holocaust (VPORH) protested the decision, saying that it „killed the good intentions of that part of Czech society which would like to regain the trust of the entire Romani community". At a press conference in Prague on May 10, the Hamburg-based Roma National Congress, backed by several Czech Romani organisations, called for the boycott of Czech products in order to bring financial pressure on the Government. They also urged visitors to the Czech Republic to avoid eating Czech pork, as it might have been produced at Lety.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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