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ERRC Challenging Evictions in Romania

9 April 2014

In December 2010 76 Romani families were evicted from their homes on Coastei street in the city of Cluj-Napoca, in North Western Romania. They were evicted in the middle of winter, in contravention of Romanian law. They were not given proper notice, or even enough time to gather all of their belongings.

The families were given accommodation in small modular units on the site of the city’s main rubbish dump, at Pata-Rât, outside Cluj-Napoca in 16 metres squared units, without hot water. Each bathroom is shared between four families. The area is remote and isolated.

The European Roma Rights Centre supported the evicted families to take a legal case following the eviction and relocation to the site of the rubbish dump. In December 2013 Cluj County Court held that the eviction was illegal, and that the module accommodation did not comply with domestic law. The court ordered city authorities to relocate the evicted families. City authorities decided to appeal the decision. This video tells the story of the community from Coastei street and their continuing struggle for justice.

 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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