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ERRC scholarship recipients

3 April 1999

Since 1996, the ERRC has awarded scholarships for legal and public administration studies to the following Romani students:

Albania

Vjosa Bodo, University of Tirana, Facluty of Law, Tirana
Saimir Mile, University of Paris, Faculty of Law, Paris
Bujar Taho, University of Tirana, Faculty of Law, Tirana
Marsida Tare, University of Paris, Faculty of Law, Paris

Bosnia-Hercegovina

Sanela Besić, University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Law, Sarajevo
Nedžad Jusić, University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Law, Sarajevo
Nihad Karić, University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Law, Sarajevo

Bulgaria

Yulian Balchev, Free University of Varna, Faculty of Law, Varna
Janush Chobanov, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Vencislava Coneva, Neofit Rilski University, Faculty of Law, Blagoevgrad
Metodi Dimitrov, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Bisser Hristov, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Faculty of Law, Sofia
Ivan Ivanov, Varna University, Faculty of Law, Varna
Javor Kirilov, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Pavlina Kostova, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Evgenij Kotzev, Saint Petersburg State University, Faculty of Law, Saint Petersburg
Guentcho Linkov, University of National and World Economics, Legal Studies Department, Sofia
Maria Metodieva, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Zarko Ognyanov, Technical University of Varna, Faculty of Law, Varna
Bogdana Rajceva, New Bulgarian University, Faculty of Public Administration, Sofia
Orhan Tahir, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Faculty of Law, Sofia

Czech Republic

Anna Červeňáková, West Bohemia University, Plzeň

Great Britain

Hester Hedges, De Montfort University, Faculty of Law, Leicester

Hungary

Tímea Borovszky Veressné, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
Éva Csonka, University of József Attila, Faculty of Law, Szeged
László Farkas Jr, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
László Farkas Sr, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
László Fórika, ELTE University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
Ernő Horváth, University of Veszprém, Faculty of Public Administration, Veszprém
Andrea Juhász-Miczura, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
Ernő Kállai, ELTE University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
Rita Kovács, University of Miskolc, Faculty of Law, Miskolc
Anna Orsós, University of Veszprém, Faculty of Public Administration, Veszprém
Rita Vásárhelyi, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law, Budapest
Rihárd Veress, University of Miskolc, Faculty of Law, Miskolc

Macedonia

Demir Dalip, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Faculty of Law, Skopje
Anifa Demirovska, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Faculty of Law, Skopje
Muhammad Halim, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Faculty of Law, Skopje
Sead Memedi, St. Cyril and Methodius University, Faculty of Law, Skopje
Iljaz Severdžan, St. Cyril and Methodius University, Faculty of Law, Skopje

Moldova

Pavel Andreychenko, Slavic University, Faculty of Law, Chişinau
Kristina Radukan, Slavic University, Faculty of Law, Chişinau

Romania

Ramona Barbu, Romanian-American Unversity, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Virgil Bitu, Spiru Haret University, Constanþa
Gina Dorin Constatin, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Law, Constanþa
Mihai-Roberto Costache, Romanian-American Unversity, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Stefania Fieraru, Hyperion Unversity, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Florin Fleican, Gheorghe Cristea University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Anghel Gheorghe, Dimitrie Cantermir University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Georgana Horohai, Hyperion Unversity, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Ionela Eugenia Mihalache, Ecological University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Diana-Florentina Muti, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Law, Constanta
Lavinia Olmazu, Gheorghe Cristea University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Artur Raducanu, Dimitrie Cantermir University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest
Daniela Saicu, Dimitrie Cantermir University, Faculty of Law, Cluj-Napoca
Eva Serdean, Babes-Bólyai University, Faculty of law, Cluj
Diana Sima, Dimitrie Cantermir University, Faculty of Law, Bucharest

Spain

Francisco Camacho Cabello, University of Jaén, Faculty of Labour Relations, Jaén
Rafael Perona Cortes, National University of Distance Education, Barcelona
Juan Carlos Flores Pavon, University of Córdoba, Faculty of Law, Córdoba
Manuel Reyes Reyes, University of Córdoba School of Judicial Practice, Córdoba

Ukraine

Aladar Adam, Inter-regional Private Academy of Business Management, Legal Studies Department, Uzhorod
Elvira Bozhana, Uzhorod Regional University, Faculty of Law, Uzhorod
Ernest Buchko, Inter-regional Private Academy of Business, Law Faculty, Uzhorod
Bertalan Horvath, Transcarpathian Educational-Consultation Center, Faculty of Law, Uzhorod
Serhij Jermoshkin, Odessa State University, Institute of Postgraduate Studies, Odessa
Fedor Kondur, Odessa State University, Faculty of Law, Odessa
Lina Kondur, Odessa State University, Faculty of Law, Odessa
Nyina Muntyanu, Inter-regional Private Academy of Business Management, Legal Studies Department, M. A. programme, Uzhorod

Yugoslavia

Petar Antić, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Law, Belgrade

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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