Horizontal Rule

European Court of Human Rights Finds that Czech Government Violated Right to Fair Trial

3 April 2006

On 1 March 2006 the European Court of Human Rights found the Czech Government in violation of the right to a fair trial (Article 6 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms) in the case of Krasniki v. the Czech Republic. The European Roma Rights Centre along with Czech attorney David Strupek filed an action to the court on behalf of Hasan Krasniki on 2 September 1999. Krasniki was found guilty of production and possession of narcotics in 1997 through the testimony of two anonymous witnesses who did not use their true names and who testified behind a curtain, one of whom did not testify at the final hearing, and one of whom claimed fear of violence. Czech authorities based their approval of these tactics on Czech law which has since been changed. The Czech court ignored the fact that the defendant was not even in the Czech Republic much of the time claimed.

The Court found that while anonymous witnesses may be compatible with the Convention, in this case they were not. Any such use of anonymous witnesses must be counterbalanced to test the witnesses' reliability and no conviction should be based solely or decisively on anonymous statements. Since this was the case, the Court found a violation of Article 6.1 and 6.3(d) (right to a fair trial) and awarded the applicant 2,500 EUR.

(ERRC)

Horizontal Rule

ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

more ...

horizontal rule

The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

more ...

horizontal rule

Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

more ...

horizontal rule