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G.H. v Hungary (2015)

17 July 2015

Forum: European Court of Human Rights
ERRC role: Representative
Status: Inadmissable

The case concerned the sterilisation without consent of a Hungarian woman (not Roma herself but, at the time, married to a Romani man and treated as Roma by hospital personnel) who had been hospitalised for pregnancy-related complications. Despite the fact that the state of medical emergency in which she found herself left her in no position to request or permit the procedure, the hospital claimed that she orally consented to the sterilisation. The applicant had successfully obtained compensation from the hospital by pursing civil action in the Hungarian courts, though the amount was substantially smaller than that which was awarded to victims in the usual forced sterlisation case.  The applicant, represented by the ERRC, complained to the European Court of Human Rights that the Supreme Court’s judgment, reducing the amount of damages because of the finding that she had “consented” to the sterilisation, did not remedy the human rights violation she had suffered; the applicant maintained that she had never given consent and, in any event, was in no position to consent during a pregnancy-related medical emergency. The Court ruled her application inadmissible, claiming that she lacked victim status.

More information regarding this case can be found in this ERRC blog post.

An anonymised version of the application submitted to the Court can be found here.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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