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Killer sentenced to imprisonment in Hungary

12 April 2000

On July 18, 1999, in Mándok, Eastern Hungary, a 21-year-old non-Romani man named Zoltán S. entered the home of Mr L.D. wearing a mask and attacked a Romani woman named T.K. with a knife. The noise woke the woman’s children — 20-year-old Tünde, 16-year-old Ernő and 15-year-old Emese. In the fight, the attacker injured the woman and the two younger children. Ernő managed to pull the mask off the person and the family recognised their 21-year-old neighbour Zoltán S. who following the disclosure of his identity, ran away. The three family members were taken to hospital with severe bodily injuries. Ernő died the following day as a result of injuries sustained in the attack. Emese and her mother are presenty being treated at the department of psychiatry in Nyíregyháza for trauma resulting from the assault. On January 25, 2000, Zoltán S. was sentenced by the Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg County Court to twelve years’ imprisonment for killing the 16-year-old Romani boy with a knife and wounding his sister and mother. Zoltán S. appealed the verdict. A person whom police identified as the instigator of the incident, a relative of the partner of Ms T.K., reportedly disapproved of his relatives living together with a Romani woman. At the court, the instigator, Mr M.S., claimed that he had only asked the defendant to frighten the woman. Mr M.S. was also sentenced. “What made the tragedy happen was racial motivation,” said Mr Albert Balogh, head of the Foundation for Romani Civil Rights Nyíregyháza office that provided legal assistance to the victims. The court did not rule on racial motivation in the case.

(Roma Press Center)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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