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Kindergarten Workers Abuse Romani Boy in Bulgaria

29 July 2004

On April 29, 2004, Ms Rumyana Angelova, a Romani woman from the northeastern Bulgarian town of Shumen, testified to ERRC that several weeks earlier a worker at her son's kindergarten known as "Dida" physically and verbally abused her 6-year-old son David Marinov. According to Ms Angelova, for about one week, Dida made such racist statements to her son as "You are a nasty tribe" and "You are dirty and your mother is dirty, too." She also reportedly slapped David on the back on several occasions and violently pulled his ears. David's teacher, Ms Yordanova also reportedly ver-bally harassed David. Ms Angelova confronted Dida and Ms Yordanova about their behaviour and was told she should send David to another kindergarten if she didn't like the one he attended. Soon thereafter, David was moved to another kindergarten, which is attended by a larger number of Romani pupils. Ms Angelova also wrote a letter of complaint to the director of the kindergarten, but as of the end of April 2004, there had been no response. (ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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