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Latvian Court Finds Employment Discrimination in Case Brought by Romani Woman

13 November 2006

According to information published on the website the Latvian National Human Rights Office (LNHRO), on 25 May 2006, the Jelgava City Court issued a finding of discrimination in access to employment in a civil case brought by the LNHRO on behalf of a Romani woman. At the end of 2005, the Romani woman, who was not named, approached the LNHRO after she applied for work at the Palso company as a salesperson. The woman, who was sent for the interview by the Latvian employment bureau, claimed that her interviewer told her that she was not appropriate for the position, allegedly because of her accent when speaking Latvian, without even considering her qualifications. The Romani woman believed the interviewer's response to be the result of her ethnicity, so, failing to achieve a conciliatory agreement with Palso, the LHNRO filed the civil case, seeking compensation for moral damages. In its 25 May decision, the Jelgava City Court ordered Palso to pay 1,000 Latvian lats (approximately 1,420 EUR) in damages to the Romani woman in question. Ms Liga Biksiniece, head of the LNHRO Discrimination Prevention Unit and representative of the Romani woman in court, was quoted as having expressed satisfaction with the court's finding and stating that the decision constituted the first time in Latvian jurisprudence when a person received compensation because of discrimination on the basis of ethnicity in access to employment.

(LHNRO)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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