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Low Romani Attendance in Greek Schools

10 July 2002

According to the Athens-based daily newspaper Avgi of May 30, 2002, Mr Nikolaos Gesoulis, Greece's Deputy Minister of Education, stated that, in secondary schools in the municipalities that Roma live in, in the Argolida Prefecture in northeastern Pelo-ponesse, "no Romani child is attending, or has attended classes for the past three years." Mr Gesoulis's statement was based on document no. 27893/18 of the Secondary Education Directorate of the Argolida Prefecture, dated April 3, 2002. According to the information submitted by the Greek government to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child, of the 742,866 primary school (excluding kindergarten) children in Greece, only 8,500 are Romani. Accordingly, of the 731,910 secondary school children in Greece, only 1,750 are Romani ( Full text of the report ).

Non-governmental organisations working on Roma rights issues in Greece state that they believe the number of school-age Romani children in Greece is significantly higher. According to the 2001 Ministry of Education Circular F4/115/G1/791, Section B, "[…] principals and teaching staff should not only admit Romani schoolchildren to school, even if they do not have all the necessary documents, but they should also actively try to find them and, in co-operation with the schoolchildren's parents and other competent agencies, ensure the schoolchildren's school attendance" (Full text of the Circular ).

(Avgi)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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