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Marija Sulejmanova

7 August 2017

Marija Sulejmanova was born in 1991 in Skopje, Macedonia. She holds a BA degree in Law from the Law University “Iustinianus Primus” – Skopje. She is an alumna of the RAP program, and currently, she is finishing her studies in Human Rights at the Central European University.

During her university studies, she was volunteering in the Ministry of Justice and took part in the activities of ELSA. She was also a street-law lecturer in Young Educational Forum and Romaversitas.

The main issues on which she worked on during her studies in RAP and CEU were the political system in Macedonia in relation to minorities (especially those which are less than 20%) and interpreting the Macedonian Constitution regarding the adopted framework agreements for overcoming the conflict in 2001 and the political crisis in 2015/16.

The field of human rights is a circle of activities which combine research, litigation, challenging the state in respecting its obligations and raising awareness campaigns on social media. Having said that, Marija considers ERRC as the perfect place for gaining practical experience in human rights and Roma issues. 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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