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New aliens act in Czech Republic criticised as opening space for arbitrary treatment by authorities

12 April 2000

A new law on the residence of aliens, which went into effect in the Czech Republic on January 1, 2000, together with amendments to several other laws relevant to foreigners’ residence in the Czech Republic, has come under heavy criticism by human rights activists who fear the law allows police arbitrary powers. Activists were particularly critical of Article 5 of the law, which specifies a list of documents police can demand of an alien applying for residence, but are not required to demand. Activists fear that police will require documents only of people they do not like, and that dark-skinned foreigners — including Roma — will be primarily affected. Many have also criticised Article 65 of the new law, which states that foreign spouses of Czech citizens have the right to permanent residence, but spouses of foreigners with permanent residence do not have the right to permanent residence. Since many benefits and basic social services are linked to permanent residence, many families of foreigners may not have access to social benefit or the right to work. This concerns among others many Roma who were denied Czech citizenship in 1993 and have not acquired it since.

(ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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