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Pharmaceutical Firm Ordered to Pay Compensation for Discriminating against Roma in Czech Republic

29 July 2004

On March 31, 2004, the City Court of Prague ruled that the pharmaceutical company Rossman, spol. s.r.o. had discriminated against Ms Renata Kotlárová, a Romani woman from Czech Republic, and ordered that the company pay her 50,000 Czech crowns (approxi-mately 1,580 Euro) in non-pecuniary damages and issue a formal apology, according to the Prague-based non-governmental organisation Centre for Citizenship/Civil and Human Rights (Poradna). The Court's decision came after Ms Kotlárová applied for work at a Rossman pharmacy in the western Czech town of Cheb in June 2003, after the position of shopkeeper was advertised. When Ms Kotlárová applied, she was informed that the position had already been filled and was not interviewed. Several minutes after Ms Kotlárová left, a non-Romani employee of Poradna entered the shop, applied for the position, was interviewed and informed about the working conditions and salary. Ms Kotlárová and the representative of Poradna put forth the same qualifications. Ms Kotlárová had demanded 250,000 Czech crowns (approximately 7,880 Euro) and an apology as compensation. Poradna brought the case on behalf of Ms Kotlárová together with attorney David Strupek. As of June 10, 2004, Poradna informed the ERRC that Rossman, spol. s.r.o. appealed the decision. (Poradna)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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