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Police Officer Sentenced for Killing Romani Man in Greece

10 May 2003

Research conducted by the ERRC in partnership with the Athens-based non-governmental organisation Greek Helsinki Monitor (GHM), revealed that on March 3, 2003, the Three Member Circuit Appeal Court of Levadeia upheld the inadequate April 17, 2002 decision of the Three Member Misdemeanours Court of Levadeia, sentencing Officer Dimitrios Trimmis to two years imprisonment, suspended for three years. Officer Trimmis was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the November 20, 1996, shooting death of Mr Anastasios Mouratis, a 45-year-old Romani man. Mr Mouratis, father of six, was shot dead while lying on the ground face down and unarmed after police had set up a roadblock to catch another Romani man suspected of murder (further information on the case is available on the ERRC website at:

- First Ever Conviction of a Greek Policeman for Abuse of Roma and

- Police Excesses against Roma in Greece ). Although the sentence is highly inadequate considering the crime, the ruling is landmark in Greece, in that it is the first ever conviction of a police officer for abuse of Roma. The ERRC and GHM provided legal assistance to the victim's family.
 

(ERRC, GHM)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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