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Prosecuting racist criminals in the Czech Republic

3 October 2000

In a decision of importance to Roma rights, on August 29, 2000, Judge Hrachovec, of the Supreme Court in Brno, overturned the verdict of the District Court of the northern Czech town of Jeseník concerning a racial attack against a Romani man named Tibor Mižigar. The Czech Press Agency reported that Judge Hrachovec critised the District Court judge for examining the actions of the four skinheads acquitted only individually rather than as participation in a joint racial attack.

On July 17, 1999, at 10:40 PM, a group of skinheads attacked Mr Mižigar, a twenty-seven-year old Romani man, in a bar in Jeseník. The skinheads shouted racial abuse at Mr Mižigar and threw pool balls at him, before attacking him with baseball bats and pool cues. Mr Mižigar was seriously injured and required two weeks to recover. O bservers noted that the attack appeared to have been an attempt to kill Mr Mižigar (See "Snapshots from Around Europe", Roma Rights 3/1999).

On January 24, 2000, the District Court of Jesenik returned an extremely unsatisfactory decision on the case: only two of the six men originally indicted were found guilty of damage to health and racially motivated damage to health (Criminal Code Articles 221 (1 and 2b)), disturbing the peace and disturbing the peace in a group (Articles 202 (1 and 2)), and defamation of nation or race (Article 198 (1a)) Mr Radek Šupa was sentenced to eighteen months imprisonment, and Mr Edvard Šindler was sentenced to twenty-two months imprisonment: both had been previously convicted in connection with racially motivated attacks. The remaining four individuals were acquitted (See "Snapshots from Around Europe", Roma Rights 1/2000). Due to this Supreme Court decision, the case will be returned to the District Court of Jeseník which will have to issue a new ruling in accordance with the Supreme Court's instructions.

(Czech Press Agency, ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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