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Roma in Slovenia Threatened with Segregation at School

22 July 2005

According to information provided to the ERRC by Mr Roman Tasic, Romani representative in the Municipality of Novo Mesto, in the village of Bršljin, eighty Romani children who attend the village's primary school are to be placed in separate classes from non-Romani children in school, effective beginning April 4, 2005.

Mr Tasic also informed the ERRC that at the beginning of February 2005, there had been a conflict between a Romani parent and a teacher from the Bršljin school, involving physical abuse against the teacher by the Romani parent. The parent had allegedly reacted to the reported physical abuse of his son, Robi Brajdič, a 12-year-old Romani student, by the same teacher. After this incident, parents of non-Romani students at the school reportedly pressured the school authorities to expel the Romani children from the school.

In their response to a letter of concern sent by the ERRC, Dr. Milan Zver, Minister of Education and Sport, expressed that the "there has been no segregation and discrimination on the basis of ethnic origin" but that a new curriculum had been developed for those having trouble adapting to the standard curriculum. Dr. Zver asserted that "the educational groups are mixed, consisting of Slovene and Roma children…" As of June 13, 2005 classes in Bršljin remain mixed and there are reportedly no plans for segregation.

(ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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