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Roma plaintiff wins civil suit contesting restaurant discrimination in Hungary

15 July 1997

According to the Legal Defence Bureau for National and Ethnic Minorities (NEKI), on July 7, 1997, a city court in Pécs, south ern Hungary, ordered restaurant owner József Berta to pay a 150,000 HUF fine (approximately 820 USD) to Mr. Gyula Góman, a Romani man whom he had refused to serve in September 1995. Ruling in a civil lawsuit brought on behalf of the victim by attorney Imre Furmann, the court found that Mr. Berta had violated Mr. Góman's rights by refusing to serve him because of his ethnic origin. According to the 1996 White Booklet published by NEKI, Mr. Berta told Mr. Góman that he would not serve him because, "No Gypsy is allowed to eat, drink or enjoy himself in my pub." Earlier in the year, a second instance criminal court in Pécs upheld a lower court ruling in connection with the same incident and imposed a fine for slander on Mr. Berta (see Roma Rights, Spring 1997).

NEKI has reported that the civil court additionally ruled that Mr. Berta be required to place an announcement publicly apologising to Mr. Góman at his own expense in Népszabadság, Hungary's most widely read daily newspaper. The text of the public apology has been specified by court, but had not yet been made public at the time of publication. (NEKI)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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