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Roma Prohibited from Registering Residences in Slovakia

29 October 2003

Mr Miklos Hlavác, a Romani man from the village of Jarabina in Slovakia's Prešov region, informed the ERRC, in partnership with the Košice-based Slovak Roma Press Agency (SRPA) that approximately one hundred and forty-five Roma from the Stará Lubovňa district in the village have experienced difficulties in registering their residences for the past several years. According to Mr Hlavác, Roma in the district had been applying for several years to obtain either permanent or temporary resident status in Jarabina. However, Mr Mikulás Kana, the mayor of Jarabina, has reportedly refused to register women from other areas who have married local men and have been living in the village for years. The children of such women are not registered either. Mayor Kana informed the ERRC/SRPA that "Roma do not have rights to the land they have built on [?]." Mayor Kana further stated that if he allowed the Roma to register, they would request the improvement of their poor living conditions, which would create problems for him.

Approximately thirty Roma from Jarabina submitted a petition to the Jarabina Local Council, requesting that the issue be solved. Roma in Jarabina who have been prohibited from registering their residence are unable to register with the Employment Office in the village, so they must travel to their place of origin to inquire about employment opportunities.

(ERRC, SRPA)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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