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Romani Organisations unite against right-wing campaign in Germany

3 April 1999

The German daily Junge Welt reported on January 28, 1999, that twenty-seven organisations, among them the Hessen-based Union of Sinti and Roma, had formed an alliance to call upon the centre-right opposition parties CDU/CSU to stop a signature campaign against the amendment of the German law on citizenship. Shortly following their election in October 1998, the coalition government comprising the Social Democratic Party of Germany and the Greens/Union 90 announced, as part of a package programme for the new govern-ment, that it would seek to amend the frequently criticised law on German citizenship. The present law is based on the blood-principle of national belonging - the notion that citizenship is awarded on an ethnic basis - and rules out the possibility of dual citizenship. The planned changes have divided the right-wing opposition into nationalist and tolerant camps, especially after the CSU began the signature campaign against the amendment in December. Roma, especially among the large Turkish and Yugoslav communities, would benefit from the proposed amendment to the law.

In other German news, on January 27, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty reported that German border guards had refused entry to two separate groups of Czech and Slovak Roma because they did not have the required amount of money - fifty German marks (approximately 25 euros) per day - to enter the country. The report claimed that the majority of people crossing the German border were not required to prove that they had the necessary amount of money.

(Junge Welt, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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