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Romanian Authorities Urged to Stop Private Security Patrols

2 August 2011

Budapest, 2 August 2011: Today, the ERRC sent a letter to Romanian authorities expressing concern about the situation in the Municipality of Racoş, Brasov County, where municipal authorities have employed a private security firm to monitor local residents since the beginning of July 2011.

The security firm was contracted by Racoş authorities using municipal funds following conflicts between Romani and non-Romani residents of the town, according to media and NGO reports. Armed with truncheons, bullet-proof vests and guard dogs, the security guards patrol the town day and night, reportedly monitoring many Romani people, checking identification documents and the contents of their bags.

The ERRC encouraged Romanian authorities to refrain from using public funds to pay for activities which may target, threaten and intimidate Roma and to bring a swift end to the private patrols in Racoş.

For further information contact:

Sinan Gökçen
ERRC Media and Communications Officer
sinan.gokcen@errc.org
+36.30.500.1324

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

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Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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