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Romanian School Officials Refuse Enrolment of Romani Children

11 March 2005

On November 5, 2004, the Romanian Romani organization Asociatia "Thumende" Valea Jiului (Thumende) reported that two 4-year-old Romani children were denied entrance to Bucharest's Kindergarten No. 269 on October 14. The director of the kindergarten, Ms Victoria Gavniuc, reportedly stated, "If these kids are Romani, I have to tell you that I spoke with the Inspector of Kindergartens and we do not want problems […] it is better for these children to go [to] Kindergarten No. 34 because that is where children with special needs go." Thumende reported that the two children did not have special needs. Following interventions by Mr Cristian Jura, State Secretary at the Department of Interethnic Relations and State Sub-secretary Ilie Dinca, the Inspector of Kindergartens allowed the Romani children to attend Kindergarten No. 269 and apologised for the incident.

(Thumende)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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