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Simon Embacher

18 September 2014

 Simon Embacher was born on the 20th of August, 1996 in Freistadt and raised in Salzburg - Austria. He got his secondary education at the Europagymnasium Salzburg Nonntal, a grammar school with a focus on languages. The 18-year-old hence speaks English, French, Italian and German, being his mother tongue.

After opting out of the, still mandatory, military service he decided to join the organization “Austrian Service Abroad”. It was there that he got to know the ERRC. Learning about the heterogeneity of the Roma Peoples triggered his interest to get his hands onto Roma related issues. This is his first internship for an internationally acting NGO.

“The staff’s humaneness and their determination to stand up for equality is nothing but admirable!” His one-year internship started on the 1st of September 2014.

 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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