Horizontal Rule

Tania Kocheva

28 June 2012

Tania Kocheva comes from Bulgaria where she earned her degree at the Technical University of Sofia in Management of SMEs. She currently studies at the New Bulgarian University, pursuing a BA in Public Administration.

Within the Roma community in Sofia she helps Romani girls with their extracurricular activities and also assists Romani women with their applications for social benefits. She is engaged in a series of projects including "Elaboration of EU projects and Project Management" program (2009), “Together we can change the world” (2012). She was an intern at the Committee of the Italian Enterprises in Bulgaria. She was exposed to the topics of  human rights and fundamental freedoms, promotion of women's rights and equal opportunities, support for refugee populations and victims of war, antiracism training and support of equal-opportunity policies for citizens from ethnic minorities in Italy, right to education and intercultural awareness during her stay at Co-operation for the Development of Emerging Countries, COSPE Italy . She speaks Bulgarian, Russian, Italian and English.

Horizontal Rule

ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

more ...

horizontal rule

The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

more ...

horizontal rule

Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

more ...

horizontal rule