Horizontal Rule

Teacher attacks Roma in Macedonia

11 July 2000

According to reports in the Macedonian media, on May 24, 2000, Ms Dobrinka Ristevska, a non-Romani chemistry teacher at the "26 July" primary school in the predominantly Romani settlement of Šuto Orizari in Skopje, reportedly physically abused three seventh-grade students: Romani students Husnija Djemaili and Fatima Serbezovska and their ethnic Serb classmate, Maja Jovik. The Skopje daily Dnevnik reported on June 2 that the teacher slapped all three girls and grabbed Maja by her hair and hit her head against the blackboard. The teacher denied the latter charge. Ms Ristevska's reason for punishing the girls was that during a break in classes, the girls had allegedly used the staff bathroom, and then did not greet her in the hall. The punishment took place in front of the girls' classmates and their class master. Ms Ristevska apologised to Ms Jelena Jovik, Maja's mother, saying that she had thought that Maja was a "Gypsy", according to a May 30 report by the private national television station Sitel TV. On June 8, Dnevnik reported that, after interviewing the parents and investigating the case, the Macedonian ombudsman's office concluded that Ms Ristevska had abused her position of authority by physically punishing the students and had violated their dignity of person. The article claimed that the ombudsman would ask the prosecutors of the Skopje municipal court to initiate a criminal procedure against the teacher. As of July 28, no procedure had been initiated.

(Dnevnik, ERRC, Sitel TV)

Horizontal Rule

ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

more ...

horizontal rule

The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

more ...

horizontal rule

Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

more ...

horizontal rule