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Tylor-Maria Johnson

8 August 2017

Tylor-Maria Johnson is a student at Princeton University studying Sociology with concentrations in African American and American studies. She is interested in studying the effects of law and policy on constructions of race, ethnicity, gender, and class groups amongst different communities within American. In particular she hopes to study how the government had shaped the African American experience, and hopes to compare these experiences between those of other minority groups in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of race and/or law within the 21st Century. Upon finishing her undergraduate education, she is considering a going to law school.

Tylor-Maria decided to intern with the ERRC because she not only wanted to learn more about the human rights abuses that Roma face in Europe, but hoped to gain insight about how people use law to advocate for those who are marginalized. She resonated with the ERRC’s commitment of challenging discrimination, and hoped that by interning with the organisation that she would see how people can bring about justice and push for greater equality in their communities. 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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