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Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Center Concerning Kosovo For Consideration by the United Nations Human Rights Committee on the Occasion of Review of the Country Report of Task Forces on UNMIK

24 March 2006

ERRC submission on the human rights situation of Roma, Ashkalis, Egyptians and other persons regarded as “Gypsies” in Kosovo, 1999-present, provided to the UN Human Rights Committee for the closed discussion on the “Country Report” of “Task Forces on UNMIK” during its 86th session, 13-31 March 2006. The materials provided here are based on ERRC monitoring and field research into the situation of Roma in Kosovo. These include media monitoring during the period 1997-present, intensive field missions in 1999, 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2005, as well as six months of durable field presence in 2000. Following a short introduction on the RAE in Kosovo the submission includes subsections on:

  • Violence and Other Cruel and Degrading Treatment of RAE, in violation of Article 6, Article 7 and Article 9
  • Failure to Prevent Exposure to Extremely Hazardous Conditions, in violation of Article 6 and Article 7
  • Failure to Provide Remedy for Gross Violations of Human Rights, in violation of Article 2
  • Denial of the Right to Return to Place of Origin in Safety and Dignity, in violation of Article 12
  • Systemic Discrimination, in violation of Article 2 and Article 26
  • Denial of Personal Documentation, in violation of Article 16

A number of recommendations follow at the end of this document, based on materials provided here.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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