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Valery Novoselsky

12 November 2013

Valery Novoselsky was born in an assimilated Romani family in the city Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine (then the part of the USSR). After graduating from secondary school, he worked in a factory, as a hospital attendant and an apprentice shoemaker. in 1991-1995 he had studied history (externally) at the Dnepropetrovsk National University, while working in a Christian organization in Moscow, Russia. He immigrated to Israel in 1995, where he studied a Christian Theology and worked as an English-Russian translator in the Galilee Bible College in Haifa (Israeli branch of American Global University). In June 2002 he has obtained a BA degree in Theology and Bible.

Mr. Novoselsky is involved in the international Romani movement since July 1999 as the founder and the editor of the Roma Virtual Network (RVN). He is an alumni of the Roma Diplomacy Programme of the Swiss-based DiploFoundation (2005-2006). He conducted an internship with the European Roma Rights Center in March - June 2010 due to the necessity to strengthen the aspect of Roma rights defense and the image of ERRC in Roma social media. Mr. Novoselsky regularly participates in Roma-related events and workshops around the world and due to the character of this activity since June 2012 periodically resides in Budapest, Hungary. In addition to this, Mr Novoselsky participates in public initiatives of the Russian Diaspora and conducts the activities of another online media channel known as Public Diplomacy Network (PDN).
 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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