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Hadis Redjepi

12 November 2013

 Hadis Redjepi was born in 1986 in Tetovo, Macedonia. He attended primary school in Turkish and continued his education in the “Pance Popovski” – Gostivar high school, also in Turkish. After graduating there he started studying at the legal department at South–East European University in Tetovo. In 2009 – 2010 he was accepted to the Roma Access Program at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary.

Prior to joining the European Roma Rights center, he interned at the Minority Rights Group Europe (MRGI) for three months (March – May 2010). During his studies in Macedonia he was a volunteer and member of the Roma Democratic Development Association – Sonce (RDDA). While being involved there he participated in different projects, trainings, seminars and conferences. His interests are in the field of human rights, particularly the issues related to Roma. He started his legal internship with the European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC) in May 2010.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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