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Orhan Usein

12 November 2013

Orhan Usein is originally from Ohrid, Macedonia. He holds a BA degree in Political Science from the Faculty of Law at Skopje University, and an MA  in International Relations and European Studies from the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest. Prior to enrolling into the MA program at CEU, he was part of the Roma Access Program 2009/2010.

Orhan has been actively involved in the civil society sector since 2004. He has volunteered and worked for several Macedonian NGOs, mostly dealing with youth activism and project management. In 2006 he conducted a field research in Macedonia on political parties’ influence on Roma peoples’ lives. Furthermore, before joining the ERRC, he has interned at the Roma Education Fund and the European Commission, with primary tasks of conducting desk research for needs assessment purposes. His internship at the European Roma Rights Center started in October 2011.

His professional interests are immigrants and asylum seekers in Europe, protection of their rights and strategies on their social integration .
 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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