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Ana Rozanova

12 November 2013

Ana Rozanova was born in Vilnius, Lithuania. She holds a BA in Scandinavian Studies (Danish Philology) from Vilnius University and an MA in Intercultural Communication from the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom.

Ana was a trainee in the Support Team of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Roma Issues at the Council of Europe in January - April 2011 and at the European Youth Centre of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg in September - December 2011. There she was particularly active in preparation and follow up of the Roma Youth Conference and the Roma Youth Action Plan. During this time she has also been involved as a volunteer researcher and support person in the work of the Roma Community Centre in Vilnius.

Ana started her internship at ERRC in December 2012. During her time here she deepened her knowledge about the overall situation of the Roma communities around Europe and developed professional skills in order to continue her work in this field. Ana speaks fluently Russian, Lithuanian, Danish and English.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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