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Manon Fillonneau

12 November 2012

Manon Filloneau graduated with an MA in the field of “Political science and international relations” from Toulouse, France. Her masters thesis was about the right to work and the right to residency of Roma in France. After developing extensive but primarily academic knowledge about the situation of Roma in France, she thought that an experience with the ERRC could enlarge her understanding of Roma rights in Europe and that this internship seemed to be a good way to improve her knowledge and professional skills and get a good insight of what it is like to work in an NGO fighting for human rights at a European level.

Prior to her arrival at the ERRC, she completed a four-month internship in an organisation helping migrants in France through legal aid and strategic litigation. There she mainly worked with unaccompanied minors in Paris. This experience also encouraged her to learn more about Roma rights. Manon started her internship in July 2012, and has mainly worked on mapping advocacy areas of interest for achieving Roma rights in the European Union. This task has been as challenging as it has been interesting for her. “I really enjoy the work that I have been given.

In brief, being an intern at the ERRC completely matched my expectations as I am gaining more professional experience in an enjoyable working atmosphere while being in Budapest, a truly amazing city,” she states.
 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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