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Veronika Sauer

12 November 2013

Veronica Sauer spent three months as a legal intern at the ERRC. It was a great introduction to the world of Roma rights and the work of an NGO dealing with the rights of minorities for her. After spending her first year of law school doing much more disengaged, theoretical work, she was really excited by the opportunity to start seeing the law in action as she spent summer 2012 working with the ERRC. The dynamic community was definitely one of the highlights of her time here, as she learned an incredible amount both from ERRC staff and the wonderfully diverse intern community.

In addition to learning much more about the dire situation of the Roma across Europe, Veronika’s work at the ERRC doing research and assisting with European Court submissions helped her to establish a solid background both in Roma issues and in European human rights law more generally. After spending her first year of law school focused on American law, she enjoyed the exposure to a wealth of different national law systems, and welcomed the opportunity to work closely with experienced staff lawyers thinking through new arguments and polishing submissions.

“The ERRC was really supportive of our work and education both in and out of the office. The opportunity to attend lectures and conferences on Roma issues at CEU and Corvinus University as well as to attend significant cultural events really added a lot to my summer experience. I look forward to putting my new knowledge and perspective to use as I continue on with law school and eventually pursue a career dealing with international law and minority rights issues.”

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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