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Ararat Gocmen

6 July 2015

Ararat Gocmen is a student at Princeton University, studying history with secondary concentrations in French and Italian. His primary academic interest is the political history of the United States and Western Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly the history of labor movements in the U.S., France and Italy before and after the first World War. Though still undecided about his future career, he is considering pursuing a PhD in history, a master's degree in public policy or a law degree after completing his undergraduate education at Princeton. 

Ararat decided to intern at the ERRC this summer in order to learn more about the history and current state of Roma in Europe and due to a general interest to work on questions related to public policy and law in an applied setting. He is currently a member of the ERRC's legal team, working on a project concerning anti-Roma hate crime and hate speech in France and Italy. 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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