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A Pleasant Fiction: The Human Rights Situation of Roma in Macedonia

3 July 1998

A Pleasant Fiction: The Human Rights Situation of Roma in Macedonia

This report is structured as follows: following discussion of large-scale deportations of Roma from western Europe, specifically Germany, which have taken place throughout the 1990s, the report discusses the effects on Roma of the 1992 Act on Citizenship, and the existence of high numbers of stateless persons among Roma in Macedonia. The following chapter discusses ethnic tensions and racially motivated violence against Roma. In chapter five, police and judicial abuses of Roma rights, especially police violence, court failure to remedy police violence, and a denial by Macedonian authorities of the existence of anti-Romani hate crime are discussed. Chapter six addresses the issue of forced homelessness and abuses by municipal authorities, including instances of discrimination in the allocation of social welfare payments and chapters seven and eight discuss political abuse and education respectively. Finally, service bans in restaurants, bars, clubs and discos are presented. The report concludes with ERRC recommendations to the Macedonian government.

A Pleasant Fiction: The Human Rights Situation of Roma in Macedonia

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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