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Roma Rights 1 2014: Going Nowhere? Western Balkan Roma and EU Visa Liberalisation

1 October 2014

This issue of Roma Rights draws attention to Roma from the Western Balkans and EU visa liberalisation. Migration of Roma from the Western Balkans has attracted significant attention, which at times amounts to hysteria. It has had an impact on migration policy both in countries of origin and target countries for migration. Romani migration has also become a common topic in public discourse, often framed in negatively by media and by public figures. The articles in this issue assess the motivations for Romani migration, the impact of migration policies on Roma, and the experience of Romani migrants. 

Roma Rights 1 2014: Going Nowhere? (PDF)

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Destruction des progrès, progression des destructions : Les femmes et enfants roms, citoyens européens en France

16 September 2014

Ce rapport traite plus particulièrement de la situation des Roms de Roumanie vivant dans des bidonvilles en France. Il n’aborde pas la problématique des droits humains des Roms d’autres pays, de l’UE ou non, ni des Roms français, Sinti, gens du voyage, Manouches, etc. 

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Destroying Progress/Progressing Destruction: EU Romani Women and Children in France

16 September 2014

This report specifically addresses the situation of EU Romani citizens from Romania living in informal settlements in France and does not deal with the particular human rights concerns of Roma from other EU and non-EU countries or French Roma, Sinti, Gens du Voyage, Manouche, etc. 

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