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Abandoned Minority: Roma Rights History in Kosovo

18 October 2012

Abandoned Minority: Roma Rights History in Kosovo

Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians are among the most vulnerable of the communities in Kosovo. More than 10 years after the ethnic conflict in Kosovo they remain marginalised and unable to rebuild their lives. In Kosovo, many live in segregated informal settlements offering substandard, overcrowded conditions. Many are displaced, unable to rebuild and return to their original homes. Several IDP camps and social housing complexes housing members of these groups continue to provide unhealthy and even toxic conditions. Unemployment is one of the biggest problems facing Roma, Ashkali and Egyptian communities. Privatisation, lack of education and professional qualifications and discrimination all represent obstacles to work. Minority quotas in public and private employment are often filled by other groups. Many Roma, Ashkali and Egyptian pupils do not complete primary school and very few access secondary school or tertiary education. Access to education is compromised by serious poverty and school segregation is a problem in some places. The unaffordable cost of medicines, substandard or discriminatory treatment and inadequate service from ambulances contribute to poor health conditions among Roma, Ashkali and Egyptian communities.Violence and intimidation remain concerns among Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians, as does the lack of justice for past crimes committed against them. A great number of Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians remain outside Kosovo, facing forced return to a place unprepared to support their integration. Kosovo’s excellent legal, policy and institutional framework to support Roma inclusion is undermined by inadequate information, funding, implementation and insufficient employment in public and private institutions of Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians.

Abandoned Minority: Roma Rights History in Kosovo (PDF)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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