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Cazacliu and others v Romania (2017)

24 November 2017

The case concerned the forced eviction of Romani people from a building in which they had been living in Tulcea, Romania, after their homes burned in 1999. The eviction took place in 2006, amid racially charged statements by the mayor. The applicants were reduced to living in very poor conditions near a waste dump.

Some of the applicants, with our support, also took a case in the domestic courts in Romania. The domestic courts found that the eviction violated their human rights and awarded them approximately €450 each.

Usually, people can only go to the European Court of Human Rights after they have been through the national courts. This is called “exhausting domestic remedies”. The argument before the European Court was that the applicants did not need to go through the domestic courts first, because Romanian law did not provide adequate remedies against this kind of eviction.

The European Court disagreed. It decided that the applicants who had brought a domestic case had received sufficient and appropriate redress. Their complaints were dismissed as they were no longer “victims” of a violation of the Convention. The European Court found that those applicants who did not bring a case in the domestic courts should have done so. Their complaints were dismissed for failure to exhaust domestic remedies.

The Court’s decision can be found here.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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