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Czech court banishes Rom with Czech citizenship

10 September 1998

Mladá Fronta Dnes reported on May 28 that on the previous day a district court in Teplice in northern Czech Republic had sentenced a Romani man named Milan Sivák to expulsion from the country, despite his being in possession of Czech citizenship. In addition to nine years of imprisonment, Judge Miroslav Čapek ruled that Milan Sivák, born in Pardubice, Czech Republic, shall be expelled from the country. Mr Sivák has had Czech citizenship since February 1998. He was convicted on charges of rape, robbery, blackmail, bodily harm and theft. Judge Čapek told Mladá Fronta Dnes, "At the time when Sivák committed the criminal activity, he still had Slovak citizenship inherited from his parents. Officials from the Ministry of the Interior granted him Czech citizenship as late as this year. They even waived the fact that he had been convicted several times before." Under a 1996 amendment to the Czech Republic's citizenship law, Interior Ministry officials have discretion to waive a five year clean criminal record requirement in order to grant citizenship to former Czechoslovaks. Judge Čapek went on to state, "[...] it is in the interest of the Czech Republic's inhabitants that such a man is expelled. The court does not have to accept the decision of the ministerial officials." Judicial expulsion of a country's own citizens is almost unheard of and is in drastic violation of international law. Mr Sivák has appealed the decision.

(Tolerance Foundation, Mladá Fronta Dnes)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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