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Discrimination in Access to Public Services in Bulgaria

7 May 2002

According to a February 28, 2002, press release by the Sofia-based non-governmental organisation Human Rights Project (HRP), in January and February 2002, HRP received many reports from all over Bulgaria of Roma being denied access to restaurants, bars and cafés. On January 26, 2002, for example, HRP received a complaint from the town of Samokov in south-western Bulgaria that Roma had been refused service in several bars and cafés. Subsequent HRP investigation revealed that in a bar called Perla near the bus station, Roma attempting to have lunch were informed by staff that the café would be closed for a lunch break. Later the same day, in a confectioners shop named Luchano, Roma were allegedly turned away at the door with the explanation that only people with membership cards could enter. Finally, HRP visited a bar called Nichi, which refused service to Roma under the pretext that all of the tables in the place had allegedly been reserved. HRP reported in their press release that, when asked by HRP representatives to explain such behaviour, staff members of the aforementioned bars and restaurants stated that their employers had ordered them not to allow Roma inside the establishments. HRP also reported receiving similar information from the towns of Shumen, Vidin and Peshtera. Based on its research, HRP reports that it appears the number of discrimination cases against Roma in Bulgaria has increased in the recent past. Additional information on discrimination and other human rights abuses against Roma in Bulgaria is available on the ERRC Internet website at: www.errc.org

(Human Rights Project)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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