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Eleven-Year-Old Romani Girl Attacked at School in Spain

13 November 2006

On 16 January 2006, Europa Press reported that Q.J.A, an 11- year-old Romani girl, had been repeatedly verbally attacked and abused at the San Francisco de Almendralejo elementary school in Badajoz, Spain. According to Europa Press, students repeatedly abused Q.J.A. throughout the current school year and, on 12 January, eight children locked the girl in the school's gymnasium.

Following the 12 January incident, the pupils' teacher reportedly punished all students involved, including Q.J.A. All nine students were placed in a supervised classroom after school. At one point, the supervising teacher left the classroom and the eight students again attacked Q.J.A., kicking her and hitting her with chairs while shouting insults including "fat", "Gypsy", "poor" and "mentally retarded", Europa Press reported. The victim escaped but could not find assistance at the school, as everyone had already left for the day. The girl then left the school and her mother immediately took her to the Emergency Health Centre in Almendralejo. She was then taken to the Merida Hospital, where she received medical and psychological treatment. A medical report allegedly indicated that Q.J.A. suffered multiple concussions.

On 13 January, Q.J.A.'s family filed a complaint with the police, submitting the girl's medical reports as evidence. On 18 January, the Spanish national newspaper El Pais reported that the Consejeria de Educacion de Extremadura had also opened an investigation. However, the school's director, Ms T Serrano, and the eight students involved in the attacks denied the allegations. Additionally, El Pais also reported that the Association of Parents in Almendralejo announced its full support for the school.

The Consejeria de Educacion de Extremadura moved Q.J.A to another school as a result of the parents complaint.

(European Press)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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