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First Romani police officers in Bosnia-Herzegovina

3 April 1999

On January 11, 1999, three Roma became police officers in Tuzla-Podrinje Canton in north-eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina. Six Roma applied for positions in the police force as early as February 1998. Their applications initially met with no response at all, although on June 15 a group of non-Roma began work as police officers. After Sae Roma, a Romani organisation based in Tuzla, requested comment on the situation of Romani candidates, officials of the cantonal Ministry of Interior declared that their documents had been misplaced. Finally, three of the applicants, Mr Ibro Beganović and Mr Sabrija Mujić from Tuzla, and Mr Edin Suljić from Lukavac, were accepted and started working in January. Roma from the Tuzla region state that the political atmosphere in their canton is better than in other parts of the country, as it is the only region not governed by nationalist parties. The Tuzla-Podrinje Canton presently has the highest concentration of Roma in Bosnia-Herzegovina; many of the Roma in the canton were forcibly displaced from areas that now belong to the Serb-held region of Republika Srpska.

(ERRC)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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