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Hungarian court rules against segregation

5 January 1999

On December 1, 1998, the City Court of Nyíregyháza brought a verdict in the case of the Romani children of Tiszavasvári. About a year ago, fourteen young Roma brought a suit against the local government of Tiszavasvári. The school had separate classes for Romani children, who were not allowed to enter the gym or the cafeteria and had to hold a separate graduation ceremony (see Roma Rights Spring 1998). The court declared that the children's personal rights had been violated and ordered the local government to pay 100,000 HUF (about 500 USD) to each child in damages and court costs.

"I think that the verdict has a precedent value. This is the first verdict in a case of discrimination in the education of Romani children. I am satisfied with the fact that the court stated the existence of discrimination, but I think that the amount of compensation is not in proportion to the eight-years-long violation of the law. I also disagree with the verdict for not condemning the tendency of segregation in the school", said Aladár Horváth, president of the Foundation for Romani Civil Rights which represented the children.

The decision is not legally binding and the local government intends to lodge an appeal.

(Roma Press Center)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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