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Ombudsman criticises education policy for Hungary's ethnic minorities

2 April 1998

The ombudsman for national and ethnic minority rights Mr Jenő Kaltenbach has called minority education in the country professionally chaotic and legally hazy. Kaltenbach told a press conference in Budapest on March 3 that the Minister of Culture should eliminate irregularities in the supply of textbooks for ethnic minorities and examine the causes of mass absence by Romani children from kindergarten education. He called upon the State Audit Office president to investigate irregularities in the use of standard additional support for national and ethnic minorities. Results of a study by the ombudsman showed that discrimination in educational institutions affects almost exclusively Roma at several levels. teachers pay less attention to them and expect less from them, while separating them either within a class or by putting all Romani pupils of a school inseparate classes. The Roma, Hungary’s largest minority, number over 500,000. Their living standards fall well behind those of the rest of Hungarian society, with unemployment exceeding the national average of 10%, and approaching full in many areas. Life expectancy within the Romani community remains under 50 years, while the national average is 74.7 years for women and over 66 years for men.

(MTI)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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