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Private School in Hungary Declared Unlawful

7 November 2002

On August 30, 2002, the Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok County Administrative Office reversed the decision of the Jászladány local government to designate eleven classrooms in the local primary school as private schooling, on the grounds that such classes were unlawful, according to the Hungarian national daily newspaper Népszabadság of September 19, 2002. Several teachers in the area commented about the private school that "the segregative purpose is clear," reported the Budapest-based Roma Press Center (RSK) in May. The Jászladány local government has been widely criticied in Hungary for apparently attempting to establish a private school in order to provide "whites-only" schooling. The Administrative Office's decision reportedly followed Jászladány Mayor István Dankó's proceeding with the creation of the private school despite being asked to retract the decision to open the school by the Administrative Office in June 11, 2002, according RSK (for further details on this action, see: Ombudsman Finds Discrimination against Roma in Education in Hungary ). According to Népszabadság, the Jászladány local government was forced to re-enrol the two hundred and five children, the vast majority of whom were ethnic Hungarians, in the public school to and re-hire twelve teachers who had left the public school to teach at the private school. However, Népszabadság reported that the students previously enrolled in the private school started the school year in separate classes within the public school. On September 16, 2002, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) reported that parents of children who had been enrolled in the private school reportedly blocked a road leading into Jászladány in protest against the decision of the Administrative Office.

(Népszabadság, RFE/RL, RSK)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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